Posts in features
in review: The Endless Summer

Madame Nielsen’s novel The Endless Summer is an elegy for youth, a sensuous reflection on its fleeting promise and unrealized possibilities. Nielsen touches on gender, sexuality, love, death, and art, but, like her characters, those themes largely remain archetypal, opaque. Rather, Nielsen emphasizes the power of language in memorializing life, in imbuing it with meaning.

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things we like ft. Aisha Mirza

This week in “things we like,” essayist and artist Aisha Mirza shares with us some of their favorite things, which includes a blog about Afrofuturism and the Caribbean and African diaspora in Britain, the music of Kadhja Bonet, and their grandmother’s mince puff pastries.

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featuresSean Redmondnews
in review: Belly Up

In Belly Up, all of Rita Bullwinkel’s characters are ghosts, haunted, or both. The cast of ghosts includes: dead strangers, dead husbands, dead neighbors’ husbands, husbands in prison camps, the people that frequent 24-hour donut shops, Floridians, and more.

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weekend links: bad art, Earth Overshoot Day, The New Mods

There exists bad art, intentionally bad art, art remarking on bad practices, and art modifying bad practices. This week in weekend links, we’re reading about bad versus good art, Earth Overshoot Day, and a photographer’s series of stock images showcasing “The New Mods,” a group of young women who seek greater visibility for modestly dressed, typically religious young men and women in the UK media.

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featuresSean Redmondnews