Posts in features
in review: Contesting Modernity: Informalism in Venezuela, 1955-1975

Contesting Modernity: Informalism in Venezuela, 1955-1975, presents a comprehensive look at the work of a country exploring the liberation of democracy while battling the injustices of a global capitalist system. Editor Sean Redmond explores these tensions in a review of this compelling exhibition, on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through January 20.

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Austin Interfaces: Reading & Open Mic

fields magazine and BookWoman are partnering on a new reading series/open mic called Austin Interfaces! Expect an intimate night of poetry, fiction, music, essays, and an open mic featuring up-and-coming artists in the Austin area. Our first gathering will be on Thursday, January 17.

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featuresSean Redmondnews
interview: Laura van den Berg

Laura van den Berg is the author of two collections of short stories, What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us (Dzanc Books, 2009) and The Isle of Youth (FSG, 2013), as well as two novels, Find Me (FSG, 2015) and The Third Hotel (FSG, 2018). We spoke to van den Berg about her process of writing The Third Hotel, the unique lens that horror offers as a genre, and the way fiction allows access to hidden layers of the self.

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issue 10 release party

fields is celebrating its five-year anniversary and 10th issue release! Join us at the new Fancy Fancy studios and gallery space, located in the Bolm Studios complex at 5305 Bolm Road, Bay 9, on Saturday, December 8, from 7-10 pm. 

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featuresSean Redmondnews
Art in Conversation: Myra Lara (ep. 2)

With Seattle’s annual Short Run convention just around the corner — an underground comics and art festival — it seems fitting to chat with an illustrator who’ll be boothing at the event this year: Myra Lara. While she’s long been interested in comics, she’s especially focused her energy on it in recent years, getting published in various comics publications in the city (like Thick as Thieves) and an Ignatz-nominated anthology, La Raza Anthology: Unidos y Fuertes.

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in review: The Endless Summer

Madame Nielsen’s novel The Endless Summer is an elegy for youth, a sensuous reflection on its fleeting promise and unrealized possibilities. Nielsen touches on gender, sexuality, love, death, and art, but, like her characters, those themes largely remain archetypal, opaque. Rather, Nielsen emphasizes the power of language in memorializing life, in imbuing it with meaning.

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featuresSean Redmondin review